What is Eczema
Common Types of Eczema
Causes of Eczema
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Why Conventional Treatment Fails?
 

The conventional treatment may not work in many of the cases of eczema. The primary reason is that they treat the symptom, giving little regard to the underlying cause.

Anti-histamine works against histamine that is being produced by your anti-bodies due to the presence of allergens. In many cases this drug has little or no effect against eczema. It also cause sedation.


Corticosteroids work by switching off the immune response system. They decrease the inflammatory reaction in the skin. Corticosteroid cause immunosupression and metabolic side effects on long term administration.

With all their promise, topical, oral, and systemic steroids have drawbacks. The literature reflects more than 50 years of studies noting a variety of adverse reactions to corticosteroids - ranging from mild to life-threatening and life-altering.

Repeated use of topical steroids in the same area can cause thinning of the epidermis and changes in the connective tissue of the dermis. The skin becomes lax, wrinkled, and shiny. Affected areas can be depressed below the level of normal skin with visible telangiectasias, hypopigmentation, and prominence of underlying veins.


Anti-biotics are prescribed "in case" of a secondary bacterial infection. In most cases an antibiotic does more harm than good, by destroying the beneficial colon flora but does nothing to treat the eczema.


Emolients and lotions are fine for the dryness, the problem with many of them is that they contain petrochemicals, perfumes or some additive that aggravates the eczema.


Tar based emollients have shown to be very ineffective.


Ultra violet light therapies have also proven ineffective, very costly with long term side effects.

 

 
 

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